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The Latest Webinars from ABA

 

November 15, 2016, 2:00pm ET

 

Delivering Superior Value to

Next-Gen Investors

As Gen X/Y continue to accumulate wealth—and inherit it—crafting an appealing offering for this next generation of high-net-worth individuals has become vital to all wealth management firms. We will discuss the trends and insights surrounding the next generation of investors and how they differ from a trust, technology and engagement perspective with Peter Delano, CEB TowerGroup, and John Bird, Envestnet® | Yodlee®.

 

For more information, Click Here.

 

 

November 23, 2016, 1:00pm ET

 

How to Optimize Your Outbound Contact Strategy and Improve TCPA Compliance

The TCPA has created implications that were never intended when Congress first enacted the law in 1991. Litigation is now rampant and the effects take a negative toll on American businesses. Bank and contact center representatives with compliance responsibilities should attend this webinar led by American Banker, Early Warning and Becca Wahlquist, head of Snell & Wilmer's TCPA Practice Group to learn how to improve retail initiatives, debt collection and TCPA compliance. Wahlquist will recap her recent testimony to the U.S. Senate Commerce Committee on the unintended impact of TCPA. Hal Granoff of Early Warning will provide recommendations on what organizations can do to ensure compliance while optimizing outbound contact efforts.

 

For more information, Click Here.

 

 

November 30, 2016, 2:00pm ET

 

The Future of Omni-channel Collections

Savvy customers look for convenient digital experiences. They want to feel respected and in control. Digital self-services, when used to resolve issues autonomously, can help you foster and maintain relationships as you reach out to customers and avoid embarrassment, reduce costs, and ensure compliance with constantly changing regulations.

 

For more information, Click Here.

 

The Failure of Dodd-Frank

Weighing in at 2,300 pages and adding 400 new regulatory burdens on our economy, the Dodd-Frank Act signed into law by President Obama in 2010 is the most sweeping rewrite of our financial laws since the New Deal. Its proponents promised that Dodd-Frank would “lift our economy, end “Too Big to Fail” and “promote financial stability.” It failed.

 

Since the passage of Dodd-Frank, the big banks are bigger and the small banks are fewer. Today there are fewer community banks and credit unions serving the needs of small businesses and families.

 

Dodd-Frank enshrines “Too Big to Fail” into law. It gives Washington bureaucrats the power to officially designate large financial firms “Too Big to Fail” and then makes them eligible for taxpayer-funded bailouts.

 

Under the Obama economic strategy of which Dodd-Frank is a central pillar, Americans are suffering through the weakest performing recovery of our lifetimes. The share of able-bodied Americans in the labor force has hovered at the lowest level in nearly 40 years. Small business startups are at the lowest level in a generation.

 

The harm to consumers is very, very real.

 

It is now harder for credit-worthy Americans to buy a home. In fact, one out of five who borrowed to buy a home in 2010 will not meet the underwriting requirements of Dodd-Frank’s mortgage rules. According to the Federal Reserve, that’ll hit roughly one-third of Hispanic and African-American borrowers.

 

Services that we once took for granted – like free checking – are being curtailed or eliminated because of Dodd-Frank. Before, 75 percent of banks offered free checking. Just two years after Dodd-Frank became law that number was cut almost in half.

 

Bank fees have also increased due to Dodd-Frank’s costs. This has led to a rise in the number of low and moderate income Americans who simply can’t afford to maintain a checking or savings account.

 

House Republicans offered the Consumer Protection and Regulatory Enhancement Act as an alternative to Dodd-Frank. It sought to restore market discipline, end taxpayer bailouts and protect consumers with innovative, competitive markets policed for fraud and deception. It’s time to revisit the ideas in that bill, offer new ones and replace Dodd-Frank.

 

Weighing in at 2,300 pages and adding 400 new regulatory burdens on our economy, the Dodd-Frank Act signed into law by President Obama in 2010 is the most sweeping rewrite of our financial laws since the New Deal. Its proponents promised that Dodd-Frank would “lift our economy, end “Too Big to Fail” and “promote financial stability.” It failed.

 

Since the passage of Dodd-Frank, the big banks are bigger and the small banks are fewer. Today there are fewer community banks and credit unions serving the needs of small businesses and families.

 

Dodd-Frank enshrines “Too Big to Fail” into law. It gives Washington bureaucrats the power to officially designate large financial firms “Too Big to Fail” and then makes them eligible for taxpayer-funded bailouts.

 

Under the Obama economic strategy of which Dodd-Frank is a central pillar, Americans are suffering through the weakest performing recovery of our lifetimes. The share of able-bodied Americans in the labor force has hovered at the lowest level in nearly 40 years. Small business startups are at the lowest level in a generation.

 

The harm to consumers is very, very real.

 

It is now harder for credit-worthy Americans to buy a home. In fact, one out of five who borrowed to buy a home in 2010 will not meet the underwriting requirements of Dodd-Frank’s mortgage rules. According to the Federal Reserve, that’ll hit roughly one-third of Hispanic and African-American borrowers.

 

Services that we once took for granted – like free checking – are being curtailed or eliminated because of Dodd-Frank. Before, 75 percent of banks offered free checking. Just two years after Dodd-Frank became law that number was cut almost in half.

 

Bank fees have also increased due to Dodd-Frank’s costs. This has led to a rise in the number of low and moderate income Americans who simply can’t afford to maintain a checking or savings account.

 

House Republicans offered the Consumer Protection and Regulatory Enhancement Act as an alternative to Dodd-Frank. It sought to restore market discipline, end taxpayer bailouts and protect consumers with innovative, competitive markets policed for fraud and deception. It’s time to revisit the ideas in that bill, offer new ones and replace Dodd-Frank.

Upcoming Events

Minnesota Bankers Association

Next Generation Bankers Roundtable

November 10

www.minnbankers.com

 

Wisconsin Bankers Association

WBA CFO Conference

November 17

www.wisbank.com

 

Michigan Bankers Association

Bank Management and Directors Conf.

November 30 - December 2

www.mibankers.com

 

Illinois Bankers Association

Bank Counsel Conference

December 2

www.ilbanker.com

 

National Reverse Mortgage Lenders

Annual Meeting and Expo

November 14 - 16

www.nrmlaonline.org

 

 

To get your banking or financial event onto the Great Lakes Banker events calendar, contact Charles Cooper, Editor, at editor@mybankermag.com.

Great Lakes Banker is published by Michigan Banker LLC © 2016